Macro shot
The word "macro photography" usually means photographs taken on a sufficiently large, but still not microscopic scale, i.e. from about 1:10 to 1: 1. Pictures with a scale exceeding 1:…

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Sharpness
Is sharpness important for a good photo? Yes and no. On the one hand, technically perfect photography, as a rule, should be absolutely sharp. No matter how entertaining it may…

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Back focus
Imagine a terrible picture: you bought a reflex camera, and the pictures from it come out fuzzy. However, if you look closely at the pictures, you will find that the…

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without jumping

Lens change

The main advantage of cameras with interchangeable lenses over compact cameras is, as the discerning reader has already guessed, the ability to change lenses. Changing the lens itself is a simple matter and briefly covered in the instructions for any camera. Nevertheless, there are a number of nuances that are not written in the instructions, but which you should take into account if you want to learn how to change lenses quickly, confidently and with minimal risk for photo equipment.

Change the lens should be carried out as quickly as possible. And not only because of the fear of missing out on a spectacular shot while tinkering with technology, but also because of the unwillingness to leave the Continue reading

Macro shot

The word “macro photography” usually means photographs taken on a sufficiently large, but still not microscopic scale, i.e. from about 1:10 to 1: 1. Pictures with a scale exceeding 1: 1 are already referred to as microphotographs, and everything smaller than 1:10 is considered just a close-up. The given ranges of scales are very arbitrary, and can serve only as guidelines, and not in any way rigid boundaries between individual genres of photography.
Perhaps the reader does not quite own the concept of scale, and the numbers 1: 1 tell him little about what? There is nothing complicated here. The shooting scale is the ratio of the linear dimensions of the subject to the linear dimensions of its image projected by the lens onto the matrix or film. A 1: 1 scale means full-size Continue reading

How does a digital camera work?

For full control over the process of obtaining a digital image, it is necessary, at least in general terms, to imagine the device and the principle of operation of a digital camera.

The only fundamental difference between a digital camera and a film camera is the nature of the photosensitive material used in them. If in a film camera this is a film, then in a digital one – a photosensitive matrix. And just as the traditional photographic process is inseparable from the properties of the film, so the digital photoprocess largely depends on how the matrix converts the light focused on it by the lens into a digital code.

The principle of the photomatrix
The photosensitive matrix or photosensor is an integrated microcircuit (in other words, a silicon wafer), Continue reading

How to take pictures in the cold?
Happy New Year, winter finally arrived, with snow and frost, and for many, the question arose about shooting in frosty weather, how to handle photo equipment. Not everything is as…

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Back button focus
According to an established tradition, autofocus is activated by pressing the shutter button halfway, and pressing it fully releases the shutter. However, it is often much more convenient to separate…

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RAW or not RAW
The RAW format will never be accepted. Never means “never”, and not “not in the near future”. Old photographers remember that before its appearance there were several formats that, although…

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Optimum Aperture Selection
The ability to effectively use an existing lens has a much greater effect on the sharpness of a photograph than the choice of the lens itself. The number of apertures…

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